The Pacific Northwest: An Interpretive History Revised and Enlarged Edition

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University of Nebraska Press #ad - This edition contains significant additional material on early mining in the Pacific Northwest, the environment of the region, sea routes to Oregon in the early discovery and contact period, the impact of the Klondike gold rush, and politics since 1945. The author has also expanded discussion of the roles of women and minorities and updated statistical information.

Carlos arnaldo schwantes has revised and expanded the entire work, which is still the most comprehensive and balanced history of the region. Recent environmental controversies, such as endangered salmon runs and the spotted owl dispute, have been addressed, as has the effect of the Cold War on the region’s economy.

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The Organic Machine: The Remaking of the Columbia River Hill and Wang Critical Issues

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Hill and Wang #ad - In this pioneering study, white explores the relationship between the natural history of the Columbia River and the human history of the Pacific Northwest for both whites and Native Americans. He concentrates on what brings humans and the river together: not only the physical space of the region but also, and primarily, energy and work.

It is in this way that white comes to view the Columbia River as an organic machine--with conflicting human and natural claims--and to show that whatever separation exists between humans and nature exists to be crossed. For working with the river has been central to Pacific Northwesterners' competing ways of life.

The Organic Machine: The Remaking of the Columbia River Hill and Wang Critical Issues #ad - The hill and wang critical issues Series: concise, affordable works on pivotal topics in American history, society, and politics.

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Native Seattle: Histories from the Crossing-Over Place Weyerhaeuser Environmental Books

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University of Washington Press #ad - This updated edition of native seattle brings the indigenous story to the present day and puts the movement of recognizing Seattle's Native past into a broader context. Native seattle focuses on the experiences of local indigenous communities on whose land Seattle grew, accounts of Native migrants to the city and the development of a multi-tribal urban community, as well as the role Native Americans have played in the narrative of Seattle.

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Women in Pacific Northwest History: Revised Edition McLellan Endowed Series

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University of Washington Press #ad - Together they suggest the wide spectrum of women�s experiences that make up a vital part of Northwest history. This new edition of karen blair�s popular anthology originally published in 1989 includes thirteen essays, eight of which are new.

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The Nature of Borders: Salmon, Boundaries, and Bandits on the Salish Sea Emil and Kathleen Sick Book Series in Western History and Biography

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University of Washington Press #ad - The nature of borders is about the ecological effects of imposing cultural and political borders on this critical West Coast salmon fishery. This transnational history provides an understanding of the modern Pacific salmon crisis and is particularly instructive as salmon conservation practices increasingly approximate those of the pre-contact Native past.

Soon illegal fishing, and fish piracy were endemic--conditions that contributed to rampant overfishing, social tensions, broken contracts, and international mistrust. Native peoples who fished the salish sea--which includes puget sound in Washington State, the Strait of Georgia in British Columbia, and the Strait of Juan de Fuca--drew social and cultural borders around salmon fishing locations and found ways to administer the resource in a sustainable way.

The Nature of Borders: Salmon, Boundaries, and Bandits on the Salish Sea Emil and Kathleen Sick Book Series in Western History and Biography #ad - For centuries, borders have been central to salmon management customs on the Salish Sea, but how those borders were drawn has had very different effects on the Northwest salmon fishery. The nature of borders reorients borderlands studies toward the Canada-U. S. As the canned salmon industry grew and more people moved into the region, class and ethnic relations changed.

Nineteenth-century euro-americans, who drew the Anglo-American border along the forty-ninth parallel, took a very different approach and ignored the salmon's patterns and life cycle. Border and also provides a new view of how borders influenced fishing practices and related management efforts over time.

Watch the book trailer: http://www.

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Shadow Tribe: The Making of Columbia River Indian Identity Emil and Kathleen Sick Book Series in Western History and Biography

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University of Washington Press #ad - Shadow tribe offers the first in-depth history of the Pacific Northwest�s Columbia River Indians -- the defiant River People whose ancestors refused to settle on the reservations established for them in central Oregon and Washington. At times, their independent and uncompromising attitude has challenged the sovereignty of the recognized tribes, earning Columbia River Indians a reputation as radicals and troublemakers even among their own people.

Shadow tribe is part of a new wave of historical scholarship that shows Native American identities to be socially constructed, and contested rather than fixed, singular, layered, and unchanging. Environmental changes and political pressures eroded their autonomy during the second half of the twentieth century, devotion to cultural traditions, yet many River People continued to honor a common heritage of ancestral connection to the Columbia, resistance to the reservation system, and detachment from the institutions of federal control and tribal governance.

Largely overlooked in traditional accounts of tribal dispossession and confinement, their story illuminates the persistence of off-reservation Native communities and the fluidity of their identities over time. From his vantage point on the columbia, Fisher has written a pioneering study that uses regional history to broaden our understanding of how Indians thwarted efforts to confine and define their existence within narrow reservation boundaries.

Shadow Tribe: The Making of Columbia River Indian Identity Emil and Kathleen Sick Book Series in Western History and Biography #ad - Cast in the imperfect light of federal policy and dimly perceived by non-Indian eyes, the flickering presence of the Columbia River Indians has followed the treaty tribes down the difficult path marked out by the forces of American colonization. Based on more than a decade of archival research and conversations with Native people, Andrew Fisher�s groundbreaking book traces the waxing and waning of Columbia River Indian identity from the mid-nineteenth through the late twentieth centuries.

Fisher explains how, despite policies designed to destroy them, the shared experience of being off the reservation and at odds with recognized tribes forged far-flung river communities into a loose confederation called the Columbia River Tribe.

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The Sea Runners

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Scribner #ad - In 1853, in the farthest outpost of the czar’s empire, four Scandinavian indentured servants—seven-year men no better off than slaves—resolve to escape from Russian Alaska. They steal an indian canoe and point it south toward Astoria, in Oregon, twelve hundred miles away. This novel of audacity is based on a historical incident discovered by the author, and transformed by his imagination into a sustained sweep of adventure.

The four sea runners must weather the worst the ill-named pacific can throw at them, and must weather their own fierce squalls, as day upon day, too, guided as much by instinct and determination as by map, they paddle through the magnificent maze of the Northwest Coast toward the mouth of the Columbia River.

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The Sea Is My Country: The Maritime World of the Makahs The Henry Roe Cloud Series on American Indians and Modernity

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Yale University Press #ad - He examines makah attitudes toward borders and boundaries, their efforts to exercise control over their waters and resources as Europeans and Americans arrived, and their embrace of modern opportunities and technology to maintain autonomy and resist assimilation. Joshua L. Unlike most other indigenous tribes whose lives are tied to lands, the Makah people have long placed marine space at the center of their culture, finding in their own waters the physical and spiritual resources to support themselves.

For the makahs, a tribal nation at the most northwestern point of the contiguous United States, a deep relationship with the sea is the locus of personal and group identity. Reid discovers that the “people of the Cape” were far more involved in shaping the maritime economy of the Pacific Northwest than has been understood.

The Sea Is My Country: The Maritime World of the Makahs The Henry Roe Cloud Series on American Indians and Modernity #ad - This book is the first to explore the history and identity of the Makahs from the arrival of maritime fur-traders in the eighteenth century through the intervening centuries and to the present day. The author also addresses current environmental debates relating to the tribe's customary whaling and fishing rights and illuminates the efforts of the Makahs to regain control over marine space, preserve their marine-oriented identity, and articulate a traditional future.

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Cataclysms on the Columbia: The Great Missoula Floods

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Ooligan Press #ad - Cataclysms on the Columbia tells two stories. The cataclysms at the end of the last ice age left a scabland of buttes, and rocky gorges, dry falls, but it took the detective work of geologist J Harlen Bretz to prove it to the world. His lifetime of research and unshakeable belief changed geology forever.

One follows geological research that challenged the scientific paradigm of the early 20th century, and the other chronicles the result of that research: the discovery of powerful prehistoric floods that shaped the Pacific Northwest.

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Forest Dreams, Forest Nightmares: The Paradox of Old Growth in the Inland West Weyerhaeuser Environmental Books

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University of Washington Press #ad - Firs grew thickly in forests once dominated by ponderosa pines, diseases, those firs succumbed to insects, and when droughts hit, and eventually catastrophic fires. Nancy langston combines remarkable skills as both scientist and writer of history to tell this story. Across the inland West, forests that once seemed like paradise have turned into an ecological nightmare.

. Federal foresters, intent on using their scientific training to stop exploitation and waste, suppressed light fires in the ponderosa pinelands. Fires, insect epidemics, and disease now threaten millions of acres of once-bountiful forests. Hoping to save the forests, they could not foresee that their policies would instead destroy what they loved.

Her ability to understand and bring to life the complex biological processes of the forest is matched by her grasp of the human forces at work�from Indians, fur trappers, white settlers, cattle ranchers, sheep herders, missionaries, and railroad builders to timber industry and federal forestry managers.

Forest Dreams, Forest Nightmares: The Paradox of Old Growth in the Inland West Weyerhaeuser Environmental Books #ad - The book will be of interest to a wide audience of environmentalists, historians, ranchers, foresters, ecologists, and loggers�and all people who want to understand the changing lands of the West. When light fires were kept out, a series of ecological changes began. Was it too much management�or not enough�that forced the forests of the inland West to the verge of collapse? Is the solution more logging, Nancy Langston unravels the disturbing history of what went wrong with the western forests, or no logging at all? In this gripping work of scientific and historical detection, despite the best intentions of those involved.

Focusing on the blue mountains of northeastern Oregon and southeastern Washington, she explores how the complex landscapes that so impressed settlers in the nineteenth century became an ecological disaster in the late twentieth.

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The Last Indian War: The Nez Perce Story Pivotal Moments in American History

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Oxford University Press #ad - Numerous injustices at the hands of the US government combined with the settlers' invasion to provoke this most accomodating of tribes to war. The book sheds light on the war's legacy, including the near sainthood that was bestowed upon Chief Joseph, whose speech of surrender, "I will fight no more forever, " became as celebrated as the Gettysburg Address.

Based on a rich cache of historical documents, from government and military records to contemporary interviews and newspaper reports, The Last Indian War offers a searing portrait of a moment when the American identity--who was and who was not a citizen--was being forged. And he brings to life the complex characters from both sides of the conflict, politicians, officers, and--at the center of it all--the Nez Perce themselves the Nimiipuu, including cavalrymen, "true people".

West offers a riveting account of what came next: the harrowing flight of 800 Nez Perce, children and elderly, including many women, across 1500 miles of mountainous and difficult terrain. It was, as elliott west shows, a tale of courage and ingenuity, of desperate struggle and shattered hope, of short-sighted government action and a doomed flight to freedom.

The Last Indian War: The Nez Perce Story Pivotal Moments in American History #ad - To tell the story, west begins with the early history of the Nez Perce and their years of friendly relations with white settlers. He gives a full reckoning of the campaigns and battles--and the unexpected turns, brilliant stratagems, and grand heroism that occurred along the way. This newest volume in oxford's acclaimed pivotal Moments series offers an unforgettable portrait of the Nez Perce War of 1877, the last great Indian conflict in American history.

In an initial treaty, the nez perce were promised a large part of their ancestral homeland, but the discovery of gold led to a stampede of settlement within the Nez Perce land.

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